SHE IS …

~ Author of the Kindle Best Selling eBook and

Quarter Finalist in the Amazon Break Out Novel Award Contest, FALL GIRL ~

 

ABNA Publishers Weekly Reviewer

A teen deals with the effects of bipolar disorder in this competent coming-of-age. Sixteen-year-old Annabelle Jones talks regularly to her therapist about her brother, Blake, who is bipolar. She wants so badly to let Blake take responsibility for his actions, but just can’t find a way to do it. She continues to hope that he will learn and eventually be responsible. Though Annabelle constantly bails her brother out of tough situations, she has her own trouble: her soon-to-be ex-boyfriend, Spencer, uses drugs and pressures her for sex. Enter the irresistible Tony Pinelli. But Spencer may not be so easily brushed aside: he knows a damaging secret about Blake. The author has taken on a lot of issues — some more serious than others — but managed to keep all the balls in the air and resolve each conflict, some more quickly than others. Nicely done, with a unique perspective on how difficult dealing with bipolar condition can be.

 

ABNA Expert Reviewer

What is the strongest aspect of this excerpt?

The idea here is a great idea since so often the family members of people with bipolar or other psychological disorders feel left out and alone, so this book definitely has a market. Like Anabelle thinks at the beginning of the book: they just want someone to know that they get them. As the family member of someone who has bipolar, this excerpt really struck a chord with me since I’ve been there.  I also LOVED Anabelle’s voice in this excerpt. It’s strong and clear to the reader even if she herself is hesitant to really voice her needs and wants to everyone else around her.   I also liked that you showed how Blake could be someone that Anabelle would love and want to care for. Since not every reader would understand how someone would want to care for Blake, it helps to show how close they are and why she’d go above and beyond to help him.   I also

What aspect needs the most work?

The only thing I’d change is that Anabelle would have drop kicked Spencer into a raging fire. After knocking a few of his teeth in, of course. But then I’ve gotten mighty attached to Anabelle, so I was just as heartbroken as she was when her boyfriend turned out to be a creep.   Other than that, this was pretty flipping awesome.

What is your overall opinion of this excerpt?

Fall Girl has everything that a good YA book needs to make you love it. You can’t help but fall for the character of Anabelle. When she gets hurt, you feel her confusion and pain. When she’s happy, you feel that as well.  The author did an incredibly good job at showing the highs and lows of what it’s like to be related to someone that’s bipolar. The ones who have been in Anabelle’s shoes will recognize themselves in her and the ones who haven’t will still be able to relate to her problems in life. This is definitely an undiscovered gem out there and something that absolutely deserves a chance to shine.

ABNA Expert Reviewer

What is the strongest aspect of this excerpt?

Excellent beginning, well written, clever in the way it expresses Annabelle’s feelings. The passing observations she makes about people and the world going on around her are very realistic, and not overly done. Reads well, flows well.

What aspect needs the most work?

SO far anyway, the story is very girl centered, I hope in the subsequent pages the story will become more accessible to boys as well.

What is your overall opinion of this excerpt?

A very good start to what promises to be an interesting story. I like how the story is about all the things in Annabelle’s life that make her feel like the fall girl, not just her brother’s illness. I think this makes the story much more accessible to a larger audience that may not relate to the illness aspect of the story. All teens feel taken for granted and misunderstood. I like the scenes with the mother, I think I know some mothers like that, and I like the scenes with the friends. I would keep reading this story to see where the author goes with it.

After an onslaught of life changing events back in 2007, one of which was being hospitalized and diagnosed with bipolar disorder, Marybeth knew she needed something more. A way to show the world who she was and what she was all about. So she picked up a pen and an notebook and started pouring out her soul through her words. It had been years since she had written, but it felt like she had never stopped. It took time to learn the craft and carve out her voice, but it’s been an incredible journey.

Still, she still felt there was something missing. Something more she could be doing that wasn’t just for her. When her son was also diagnosed with bipolar in 2009, after a very difficult journey to find answers,  Marybeth knew what her calling was.

Unfortunately, she did not know how to go about following this calling. Then in February, 2010, she was slapped by an idea. (To read about it’s origins click here) Why not use her aspirations of becoming a novelist to raise awareness about bipolar?

She sat on this for a few months until one day the idea came out of nowhere. How would her children be affected by hers and her son’s illness, especially as teenagers? And thus … Fall Girl.

 

Fall Girl

 

 


In July of 2010, Marybeth also started a website called Ask a Bipolar. She is determined to raise awareness for this issue. Too many people are oblivious to what this illness is and how it affects not only the people suffering from it, but also those that they love. She has since became an author for bpHope Magazine, International Bipolar Foundation and WebMD.

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